Chef Leigh’s Backpack of Blessings

Chef Leigh’s Backpack of Blessings
Meet Our FINAL High 5 Winner, Chef Leigh

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Teacher Peach is thrilled to present the 5th winner of Teacher Peach’s “Granting Teacher Goals!” High 5 Initiative, Chef Leigh!

Chef Leigh is gearing up to help those around her and her school who are less fortunate most specifically, those who find themselves presently homeless. This heartfelt High 5 Initiative reaches out into the community by developing a backpack project for those individuals and families who are currently homeless. Through charitable donations from local companies and organizations, Chef Leigh and her amazing and dedicated students gather materials and fill backpacks with useful items that truly matter—items many of us may take for granted. These thoughtful care kits not only help need some very basic needs, on a deeper level, these dignified gifts help remind people that there are people who care and want to help. This initiative helps increase student, neighborhood, and community awareness and sends a message that everyone can do something to help someone else! Teacher Peach is thrilled to help through our High 5 Initiative award, too.

LeeAndra Khan, who carefully judged all of the entries in Teacher Peach’s High 5 Initiative, explains why this project was chosen as the final winning entry. “Community Service projects not only teach students to collaborate and engage, this kind of project goes even further, teaching students the importance of having—and showing—empathy for others. Students participating in this project will also gain vital leadership skills that they will be able to apply in all of their future endeavors.”

Chef Leigh Says . . .
We had the privilege of interviewing Chef Leigh about her experiences in education and her goals for this particular project. She shared her thinking and views as follows—

TP: How long have you been teaching?
CL: All my life! I have always enjoyed sharing with others. About eight years ago, I was approached by a local technical college and asked to teach in the Culinary Arts Department. I really had a wonderful time there. Then, I was asked to consider teaching at the local high school. Having made it through high school once, I honestly was not all that eager to return, but return I did. I put on my dress uniform, my best smile, and did my best in the interview. It must have been right for all of us because I had a contract offer before I even got home. The rest, as they say, is history!

TP: Why did you become a teacher?
CL: Originally I starting teaching because I was looking for a job in the culinary field and a position opened up at the college level. It wasn’t until I began teaching high school that I realized that teaching was my “surprise destiny!”  Something just “clicked” for me when I started working with students at the high school level. My students really are eager to hear and be heard.  Once I really understood how to communicate with my students, and listen to what they have to say to me, I really began to hit my stride as an effective teacher. It takes both students and teachers to make any learning experience work.

TP: What are the most inspiring aspects of teaching for you?
CL: One of the most thrilling and inspiring aspects of teaching is being able to witness that true “aha” moment—when a student finally “gets it” and the light bulb goes on. That expression is one that can carry me for along time.Helping students engage and become hooked into what I am hoping to teach can be done so many ways and usually the kids will tell you what works best for them if you, as a teacher, are open to spotting it. I am so thankful to be on the faculty of a project-based-learning school. Here, I have the freedom to use many different avenues for instruction. I’m happy to report that it is never quite “status quo” in my classroom. On any given day, we typically have four or five different tasks going on, all of them relevant and filled with real-world connections. I know I do a lot to prepare, as any teacher should, but it’s like a stage: when the students arrive, I love seeing their individual progress and our group progress unfold in front of me.

TP: How do you think this project will impact your students and what outcomes are you hoping to achieve?
CL: Our Backpack Project is a leadership initiative through LEAD2FEED and this is the second semester we have worked through this program. It was written for high school students to allow them the opportunity to create and control a project that impacts our local community. Many of my students didn’t even realize that we had homeless students in our school, much less in the community. They had associated homelessness with downtown Atlanta where they knew there are people living under the bridges, and so forth, but not in our own community.

Through research and discussion, we were able to team up with a local church that serves the homeless population. We sponsored Candy Grams for Valentine’s Day and sold over 300! We used the proceeds to purchase items for the backpacks. Our BIG GOAL is 50 packs- 25 for local high school students and 25 to be passed out to those outside of school who may also need these items. To date, eight different clubs or teams at our school have joined in by donating needed items—and it continues to grow.

My students are now so much more aware that “societal” issues are applicable everywhere—including our own community. They have become much more civic minded, too. Hopefully, this knowledge will stick with them and will become a part of what they carry into adulthood. Having the chance to know that they are able to personally do something to make a difference to others is very powerful to learn at 15 and 16 years old. It means a lot to these kids—and to those they help.  

TP: What advice would you have for other teachers?
CL: Have confidence in your students! Our students are amazing people. Get to know that. Don’t just let them out of the traditional “box” of education—really invite them out. ANYTHING can be turned into an applicable lesson with a little forethought.  REALLY listen to what they have to say (even if it seems silly) and above all, be honest with them. My kids trust me more because I admit when I am wrong and when I admit I don’t know the answer. We all know it takes time to build relationships; take that time because it is worth it.  Sometimes the best thing you can do as a teacher is to just stop and really listen. When your students trust you—and you believe in them—you will be amazed at what can happen!

Sparked by Chef Leigh?
Chef Leigh’s advice is inspiring and motivating! Teacher Peach is proud to help Chef Leigh and her students as they continue to work to help the homeless and grow to be more engaged and involved in their community. In addition to the $100 award, Teacher Peach is also sharing some awesome products with Chef Leigh and her students.

Check out these Teacher Peach products Chef Leigh will use in both the backpacks and in her classroom …

Stick’R Treat Mega Stickers Collection
Little Black Books
What ideas does Chef Leigh’s project spark for you? How could you create or adapt a project like this for your students? What spaces surround your classroom that could be enlivened by the creativity of your kids?

Caroline Campaigns for Kindness!

Meet Our Third High 5 Winner, Caroline S.
Elementary School Principal

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Teacher Peach is pleased to present the third winner of Teacher Peach’s “Granting Teacher Goals!” High 5 Initiative, Caroline S.!

Caroline S. teaches her 2nd-4th grade students the importance of empathy with The Great Kindness Challenge! In an effort to banish bullying and create a positive school culture, Caroline and her terrific teach-mates have initiated a kindness movement. Students become engaged with activities such as creating kindness kits, fliers, posters, and decorating classroom doors. Their kindness kits include thank-you cards, decorated heart shapes, painted posters, etc. all created by students. This project goes beyond the classroom as students deliver their kindness kits to community service groups including the local police and fire department, the Mayor’s office, and more!  

Our revered judge, LeeAndra Khan, explains why The Great Kindness Challenge is such an important addition to the High 5 winning initiatives. “Schools should aim to educate the whole student. Having students exercise their voices to prevent bullying is a great step toward promoting empathy and tolerance. Students gain leadership skills and also learn the importance of collaboration. Adding the community engagement piece to the project helps students to understand their role in the larger community.”

Caroline Says . . .
We had the privilege of interviewing Caroline about her experiences in education and her goals for her project. Here’s what she had to say . . .

TP: How long have you been teaching?
CS: I have been a teacher for 19 years and an administrator for 5 years.  I am truly a teacher at heart! I love teaching students and teachers, and even teach night classes at a local college.  

TP: Why did you become a teacher?
CS: I feel like I was born to teach. I have always been involved with kids—babysitting, religious school, and tutoring.  I knew I could make a difference and would enjoy a career in teaching.  

TP: What are the most inspiring aspects of teaching for you?
CS: The most inspiring aspects of teaching are the “light-bulb moments” I see when a child finally catches on to a certain skill or strategy. Students show their appreciation with hugs and I love you’s.  This keeps me striving to be the best I can be for kids.

TP: How do you think this project will impact your students and what outcomes are you hoping to achieve?
CS: The Great Kindness Challenge has always been a very successful week of creating a culture of kindness [in our school]. I notice a decline in discipline referrals because students focus on being kind to one another.  This positive bullying prevention initiative is powerful as students have an opportunity each day to expand their compassion and learn about about other cultures and needs throughout the world.  There’s a huge impact on our community as local law enforcement officers, fire fighters, mental health providers, the town mayor, and many others come to school on Monday morning to help us kick off the great kindness challenge. Kindness quotes, kindness stations, lunch buddies, and a service project are just a few of the exciting activities that students participate in during the week. We’re excited for next time.

TP: What advice would you have for other teachers?
CS: Teaching is an incredibly complex endeavor. No one has it nailed. There are always ways to get better for students. I would remind teachers that whoever is doing the reading, writing, and talking is doing the thinking. Learning is a consequence of thinking. Teachers should provide time everyday for students to read, write, and discuss their thinking. We are smarter together. We need to collaborate with our colleagues and our students. Focus on relationships. You will get so much more from your students if they know you love them.  

Inspired by Caroline?
Teacher Peach is proud to help Caroline continue to bring The Great Kindness Challenge to her students and community. This educational project not only encourages students to become a ‘buddy not a bully’, it also encourages them to share the good will with others! In addition to the $100 award, Teacher Peach is also sharing some awesome products with Caroline and her students.

Check out just a few of these Teacher Peach products Caroline will use to help her students ‘catch some kindness’!

Quench Cups

Stress Balls

Mega Stickers

Dry Erase Clips

Common Core State Standards Kit for Success

Teacher Peach Writing Tools

Little Black Notebooks

Take a Peek!
Caroline was kind enough to share a recent The Great Kindness Challenge with us in these beautiful photos!

What ideas does Caroline’s project spark for you? How could you create or adapt a project like this for your students? What spaces surround your classroom that could be enlivened by the creativity of your kids?

Cynthia C. Goes Overseas!

Meet a Winner in Writing, Cynthia C.

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Teacher Peach is pleased to introduce the second winner of Teacher Peach’s “Granting Teacher Goals!” High 5 Initiative!  Cynthia C. engages her 6th grade students by “taking them overseas!” Her innovative High 5 Initiative blends authentic writing assignments with patriotism as her students “adopt” deployed US service personnel. Her educational project not only builds and sharpens the writing skills of her students, it also makes a powerful difference to the dedicated and brave individuals who go to incredible lengths to help keep us safe.

Our esteemed judge, LeeAndra Khan, explains why this project was a clear winner.  “This project helps to increase writing skills as well as gets students to become more globally minded. Students also learn about the locations where the service personnel are stationed. This activity helps students to develop empathy as well as understand and express their appreciation for patriotism and service.”

Cynthia Says . . .
We had the privilege of interviewing Cynthia about her experiences in education and goals for her project. Here’s what she had to say . . .

TP: Please, tell us a bit about you, how long you’ve been teaching, what grades, etc.
CC: I have been teaching since 1983, with maternity leaves, for a total of 21 years of actual time in the classroom. I have taught in several grade levels, from elementary through high school.

TP: What made you decide to become a teacher?
CC: I became a teacher because I love working with children and young adults. I achieve a personal “high” when I see them experience an “aha” moment, regardless of the content area.

TP: What have been the most inspiring aspects of teaching for you?
CC: The most inspiring aspects of teaching for me are watching my students mature in their personal, social, and academic skills. When they suddenly understand the power that they have as individuals and as a cohesive team to make change in their own lives, the school environment, and the larger community, it is a wonderful sight to see.

TP: How does (did) this project impact your students and what outcomes are you hoping to achieve?
CC: This pen pal project, sending letters and care packages to service personnel stationed overseas, has impacted my students by awakening in them a sense of patriotism; they begin to understand that the United States has a multi-faceted mission, one that protects US interests abroad, and also the interests of innocent people caught in hopeless and difficult situations caused by war. They realize that we are not only on military missions—we are also on humanitarian missions. I have been doing this project for the last nine years and this experience has impacted not only my current students, but their parents, and especially younger sibling and friends who ask, on their first day of school, “When do WE get to start the pen pal project?” That’s a powerful reach. With this additional financial support, we hope to reach even further.

TP: What advice would you have for other teachers?
CC: My advice to other teachers is to think big! Create projects that will impact your students AND a larger community. Reach out to forge partnerships in the community to enlarge the audience that becomes a part of your lesson. You’d be amazed at how community leaders are usually willing to participate; you just have to take a risk and ASK!

Inspired by Cynthia?

Cynthia’s lesson is certain to influence and inspire the lives of all of those involved—both today and long into the future. As Cynthia’s interview confirms, many of her former students and their families are already “veterans” of this activity and it has become a tradition that everyone is proud to continue. Teacher Peach is proud to help Cynthia to further enrich this project going forward. In addition to the $100 award, Teacher Peach is also sharing some awesome products with Cynthia and her students.

Check out these Teacher Peach products. Cynthia will use them to connect her students to soldiers and to keep her classroom organized all along the way!

“WRITE.” MECHANICAL PENCILS

COOL TEACHER POCKET FOLDERS: UPCOMING EVENTS

 

What ideas does Cynthia’s project spark for you? How could you create or adapt a project like this for your students?

Magnificent Murals Winner!

Meet Our First Winner of the High 5 Initiative, Amanda T.
Art and Exceptional Education Teacher

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The big moment is here! Teacher Peach is pleased to introduce the first of five visionary and talented teachers whose engaging school projects are true winners! These teachers and their projects add incredible value to their school communities. The winners of this initiative are dedicated educators and we believe their work will inspire students and colleagues alike—that’s why they were selected by principal and thought leader, LeeAndrea Khan, to receive a $100 Teacher Peach award to fuel their educational project as part of Teacher Peach’s “Granting Teacher Goals!” High 5 Initiative!

Amanda Transforms Blank Spaces into Celebrations of Art—and Life!

Amanda T. encourages her students to look at blank walls, doors, and bulletin boards and envision the colorful and informative possibilities! This heartwarming High 5 Initiative includes the beautification of her Floridian middle school and improvement of the community image of the school. With this grant, her art class will now have the freedom to continue to paint beautiful, artistic murals around the school, helping to make their school environment even more inviting for the community. Amanda’s educational project goes beyond aesthetics, giving students a unique sense of pride when they see their original works publicly displayed. It also help students to connect visual expression to some very important life lessons that serve us all well to remember.

Our esteemed judge, LeeAndra Khan, explains why this project was a “picture” perfect choice as one of the winning entries. “Getting students to be part of keeping their own community beautiful only enhances their learning experiences. It is important for students to have voice and choice in their school. This increases engagement and ultimately impacts success. When they feel like they belong there, they act like it.”

Amanda Says . . .

We had the privilege of interviewing Amanda about her experiences in education and her goals for her project. Here’s what she had to say . . .

TP: How long have you been teaching?
AT: I have been teaching for 10 years.

TP: Why did you become a teacher?
AT: I became a teacher in the field of Special Education/Art to help students who learn differently become confident in their personal learning styles—and to keep learning in their own special ways. This applies to all students, of course.

TP: What are the most inspiring aspects of teaching for you?
AT: The most inspiring aspect of teaching is to watch students become interested in and eager to participate in the learning process, enough to want to show off what they know.

TP: How do you think this project will impact your students and what outcomes are you hoping to achieve?
AT: The “Beautify the Door” Contest involves my students in my art classes. The students use perspective in the literal way with drawing buildings and then they add a written component with sayings about how we look at life—learning and behaving, for example. They’re able to see the significance in how art can impact people in a variety of ways. (We’ve included a short video illustrating her “Beautify the Door” Contest below!)

TP: What advice would you have for other teachers?
AT: My best advice to other teachers, especially new teachers, is to stay on your toes and be creative! Also, be on the lookout for where your kids are and what they bring to the table. Students drive the lesson forward by what they bring with them from their own life experiences. What they have inside and are willing to share with us can teach us, as teachers, in the process. Then we can connect the lessons to their realities in ways we wouldn’t have imagined would be possible. Just by listening, we learn, too.

Sparked by Amanda?

Amanda’s colorful concept will have a BIG impact on both her students and the community as a whole. By creating an inviting and expressive academic environment, she is inviting her students to express themselves, enhance their environment, AND she’s also reminding her students that there are people who care for them, about them, and are willing to support their successes. Teacher Peach is proud to help Amanda create these vivid, fun, and creative displays that will spark students’ creativity and curiosity—and those of the school’s faculty, too. In addition to the $100 award, Teacher Peach is also sharing some awesome products with Amanda and her students.

 

Check out just a few of these Teacher Peach products Amanda will use to help her students beautify their learning space!

Keep It Together Portfolio Case

The Box! Totefolio

Take a Peek!
Amanda shared a quick video of some of the work her students have done so far. In under a minute, she’ll give you a fast tour of how these amazing students express themselves and make connections that will inspire all of us! Go, Amanda!

 

What ideas does Amanda’s project spark for you? How could you create or adapt a project like this for your students? What spaces surround your classroom that could be enlivened by the creativity of your kids?

 

Keep Moving, We Shall!

Today is a special day, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday. There are so many moving and amazing quotations by Dr. King, as our recent PeachQuotes Studio™ Quotation campaign shows.

TP PQS Intelligence True Goal Education MLKTP PQS MLK Doing for Others  01-16-16_QUOTE-20_timecreativelyMLK_Page_1
TP PQS Worksheet MLK I Have a Dream

Dr. King’s Wisdom Made for Tough Choices
Narrowing down our choices to only several quotations by Dr. King was a tall order. We selected the quotations we did with teachers, students, and teachable moments in mind. We know that weaving in the wisdom of Dr. King is an important part of the January curriculum for many teachers.

Our goal with all PeachQuotes Studio™ Quotation campaigns is to provide quick, easy tools that teachers love and want to share with their students. As we worked with these choices, we explored different sequences, different timing, and different interpretations of each quotation. There were so many strong options, it was often tough to choose just one. However, when it came time to select the quotation for today—our last blog post of the campaign, the choice was easy. We had to end by continuing—to move forward!

Today’s quotation by Dr. King, reads:

“If you can’t fly, then RUN, if you can run, then WALK, if you can’t walk, then CRAWL, but whatever you do, KEEP MOVING!”

TP PQS MLK If You Can't

We Need to Keep Moving
There is so much to do for all of us. Not only in our own lives, in our own classrooms, and for our own families, but also for the larger communities of which we are a part. The challenges we face in the world illustrate that in some way, in some form, and in some manner, we must each keep moving. We each need to find ways to become an active part of the communities around us, in ways that work for us personally. We need to keep moving.

The Power of Small Moves
It may be as simple as making the time to attend a school meeting on a weekday morning when you are supposed to be at your desk at work, taking your child to a neighborhood production of a musical when it is below zero outside, or scrambling to find jars of glue at 7:30 on a Sunday morning to be sure the kids your child coaches can complete their craft project later in the morning. If these examples sound a bit too specific to be hypothetical, it’s because they aren’t. Each of these happened to me this past week. I realized while writing this that each of these examples represents a willingness to engage and keep moving.

I’m sharing these examples because they represent tiny steps. We can always find reasons not to keep moving. Of course, I needed to be at work, we didn’t order tickets so we needed to stand in line in the cold, and I really doubted I had the glue. But, doing it all anyway is important. We can always convince ourselves that our little moves don’t really matter. The truth is, however, they do. And they add up.

Going to that school meeting on Wednesday matters because I’m honoring a commitment and will likely be able to contribute just by being around the table with colleagues. Going to the musical matters because we are supporting the community on a day where attendance is bound to be down due to the cold. On a much more local level, my child will be able to take part in tomorrow’s lunch table discussion about the number of curtain calls. As for my early morning glue hunt? That definitely mattered because 21 little kids got to take home a sticky, delightful craft project to share with their families that underscored a learning concept. Tiny steps forward help us remember that ALL moving matters. Even small moves on the chessboard, for example, can have significant results—both the moves you make and moves you don’t.

Moving Isn’t Always Forward—at First
As teachers know only too well from the many different students that teachers strive to “move forward,” students, teaching, and learning processes are complex and definitely not linear. Moving implies a forward direction, but, sometimes we must take steps back to move forward. Even these backward steps, these reverse action moves, are moves—and they ultimately help us to course correct and move forward. So, moving matters and move we must.

Moving Through January
PQS Worksheet If You Can't MLKAs you move through these next two weeks in January in your classes, consider using this PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheet that contains Dr. King’s quotation about moving forward. As you work with your students on bigger projects, this quotation can help them to recognize that not all moves need to be flight-worthy. They don’t even need to run all the time. Sometimes just a simple, crawling-forward move, like organizing index cards or reading one extra paragraph, is enough to unlock a student who may be stuck or overwhelmed by what seems like an enormous assignment.

PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheet Idea
One way to use this worksheet with your students is to ask them to make four lists around this quotation worksheet. Title the lists: FLY, RUN, WALK, and CRAWL. Suggest to kids that they do not need to have something for every category and that their FLY item might be a sport they do well, etc. Tell them you want them to have lots more WALK and CRAWL items. They can then cross off the tasks as they move through them. Moving means progress!

Dream BIG to WIN BIG
As you head into this week, we have one more move for you to consider. Do you have an educational project that could benefit from a $100 contribution and a FREE Teacher Peach product? Want to DREAM one up? Enter Teacher Peach’s “Granting Teacher Goals!” High 5 Initiative below.


Teacher Peach Granting Teacher GoalsCTA BUTTONS

Any educational project—large or small—is eligible if it helps kids learn, teachers teach, or just makes a tricky learning objective more engaging and exciting to learn—and teach! Through January 31st, you may enter 5 different projects from a single email address, by completing a separate application for each project. Winners will be announced starting February 1, 2016.

We hope you’ve enjoyed the PeachQuotes Studio™ Quotations and Worksheets in honor of Dr. King’s birthday and that you’ll let us know how you used them in your classrooms. What are your next moves for January?

 

What You Do—and For Whom—MATTERS

TP PQS MLK Doing for Others

Urgency to Do for Others
Our most recent blog post was about the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial. The central PeachQuotes Studio™ Quotation in that post was by Dr. King and focused on creatively using time as well as the urgency with which most of us approach time. This weekend is one where many people will garner some extra time. A three-day weekend during which we may stop and celebrate the life and achievements of Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., may mean a little less urgency for many.

As today’s central PeachQuotes Studio™ Quotation by Dr. King captures, however, we must always maintain a proper urgency when it comes to our outreach to, care for, and support of others. As you consider your lesson plans for the coming week, while the official celebration of Dr. King’s birthday will be behind you once school reconvenes, the life lessons for students remain at the forefront.

A Quotable Tote
Teacher Peach JUMBO TOTETeachers can easily answer Dr. King’s question in today’s central quotation, “What are you doing for others?” The list of what teachers do for students is endless. To teach is so much more than lessons and content, as Teacher Peach’s I Teach. Jumbo Tote Bag captures. The tote’s message reads, “Yes. I Teach. So, I inspire, manage, coach, engage, solve problems, listen, detect, explore, believe, care, worry, & always make time to laugh with my kids.™”1 Teachers do this with every action, decision, and suggestion—every day.

Quotations Worksheets About Helping Others
In addition to the central quotation of this blog post, Teacher Peach has chosen five other quotations about doing for others. We’ve created worksheets for all six quotations, including Dr. King’s. These freebie PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheets are for you to use in your lesson plans, share, post, pin, print, or simply enjoy.

Perhaps you might like to mix and match these to compare and contrast these in one of your upcoming lessons. Why not divide the class into small groups and ask each group to assess one quotation based on a CCSS objective that you may be covering in other aspects of your instruction? By adding your questions to these worksheets, you can easily customize them for your classes and lesson plans.

TP PQS Doing for Others MLK Quote1 TP PQS Dickens Quote No One Is Useless
TP PQS Angelou Quote Blessed TP PQS Gandhi Quote Service of Others
TP PQS Become Poor by Giving Anne Frank Quote TP PQS Napoleon Hill Succeed Quote

How Do You Do for Others? How Did These Quotations Do for You?
Share with Teacher Peach blog readers your thoughts about these quotations and how you might use them in your classroom. What combinations might you pair together? Dr. King and Maya Angelou? What about Charles Dickens and Anne Frank? These two tell very different stories with one very similar message. What do you think? How would you use these PeachQuotes Studios™ Quotations and Worksheets to inspire your students?

What about the I Teach. Jumbo Tote? Are there other words that you would add to the Teacher Peach message on the Yes, I Teach Jumbo Tote? We’re designing new totes for Teacher Appreciation Week. Share your ideas here!

Do You Have a Project to Help Your Students?
As you head into next week, we have one last question in this post. Do you have an educational project that could benefit from a $100 contribution and a FREE Teacher Peach product? Submit up to five different educational project ideas to Teacher Peach’s “Granting Teacher Goals!” High 5 Initiative for a chance to be selected to receive a $100 contribution and a FREE Teacher Peach product.


Teacher Peach Granting Teacher GoalsCTA BUTTONS

Any educational project—large or small—is eligible if it helps kids learn, teachers teach, or just makes an objective exciting to learn—and teach! Through January 31st, you may enter 5 different projects from a single email address, by completing a separate application for each project. Winners will be announced starting February 1, 2016.

This initiative is a big part of what Teacher Peach is doing for others in February! That calls for a High 5!


1 The message on the I Teach, Jumbo Tote is wholly owned by Teacher Peach, LLC and is protected by copyright by this notice. © Teacher Peach, LLC. All rights reserved.

Big Dreams, Big Results

Dreams count. Dreams make a difference. Dreams help us reach for bigger, better results and spark us to believe we can—and will—achieve them. Big dreamers are very often big doers. Not only do students benefit from learning about the big dreams and big results of powerful leaders, they also benefit from understanding how their own dreams help build their confidence and achieve results. Teachers can deliver this lesson through both instruction and example.

Three Strong Quotes for Three January Trending Topics
As part of the PeachQuotes Studio™ series, “Dreams and More” Quotations, we’ve curated three different—and “DREAM-y”—January quotations for today’s blog post. These quotations are primed and ready to incorporate into your lessons as you wrap up this quarter and launch into third quarter of the school year.

During January, as part of the ongoing curriculum, many teachers are focusing on three topics: Martin Luther King’s birthday, Black History Month, and the benefits of goal setting for 2016. Below you’ll find a curated quotation worksheet for each of these trending topics.

Dreams are quite powerful. As you plan and move through your lessons in the coming weeks, take a look at and consider infusing one or more of these DREAM-y quotations. See our blog post, How to Use the PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheets, for more information on the strategy behind these worksheets and ideas for your classroom.

Martin Luther King’s Birthday PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheet
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., had a dream. On August 28, 1963, Dr. King spoke these powerful words:

“I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.”

—Martin Luther King, Jr.

We selected this familiar quotation because many teachers tell us they use this quotation in many different ways during January—and beyond. The worksheet layout is designed encourage students to go back into the text and deconstruct the quotation. Just write a quick direction and include a few of your own writing prompts—and go!

TP PQS Worksheet MLK I Have a Dream

Black History Month PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheet
Oprah Winfrey inspires and motivates people in many walks of life. Many say it is because she possesses an ability to reach and relate to a universal audience. Not only do her words offer encouragement, they resonate in a common-sense manner as this example illustrates.

“The biggest adventure you can take is to live the life of your dreams.”

—Oprah Winfrey

In this quotation, Oprah distilled a complex idea into a simple and understandable turn of phrase. Isn’t that exactly what teachers strive for when teaching students to capture the main idea, determine cause and effect, or dig into the text for evidence to support a point of view? Use this quotation and worksheet as an example or discussion starter. It’s an effective lesson addition: you’ll make a connection to a strong writing example and you can connect to a lesson on Black History Month, as well as building dreams, setting goals, and sticking to resolutions.

TP PQS Worksheet Winfrey Adventure Dreams

2016 Goal Setting PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheet
Though Winter Break may seem long past, we are less than a dozen days into 2016. For many, the second quarter of the school year is quickly coming to a close. Students scramble to complete (or even find!) missing assignments while teachers read writing journals and other long-term assignments to wrap up a grading period.

If you’re about to begin a new grading period, this can be an excellent time to invite students to set goals for the balance of the school year. Reflecting on the first half of the year and setting goals for the second half can be a powerful activity to help your students make even greater progress.

Just like adults, students often confuse a set of goals with a to-do list. It can help students to begin with their dreams and break down those big ideas into measurable goals for the balance of the school year. Prompt kids with questions like, “How far do you think you’ll get on that by the end of third quarter?” or “What specific things will you need to do to get closer to your goal (of an A, of finishing your homework on time, or of not forgetting things for class)?”

We selected this quote about dreams by Walt Disney for the third PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheet in this blog post for three reasons. First, most students know the name Disney, so you won’t need to spend time explaining what this author did. Second, Walt Disney set many goals and had many big dreams, examples of which are likely evident to your students from sweatshirts, TV shows, and top songs. Third, this particular belief of his was a simple, albeit enormous, one that will be easy for students to commit to memory and draw on always.

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”

—Walt Disney

In addition to the PeachQuotes Studio™ Worksheet for this quotation, we are also sharing a colorful freebie poster for your classroom or for you to post with assignments.

Why not print out the color poster a few times and post one on the door, another by the sink, and a third near the technology cart? After a few days, ask students if they noticed the quotation, what they think it means, and why they think you hung it up around the classroom. Then, use the worksheet provided to pose a question or two to help your students either reflect on past work, set goals for third quarter, or both.

TP PQS Walt Disney Dream It Do It

TP PQS Worksheet Disney Dream It Do It

For a refresher on how to set your own goals for 2016, re-read our back-to-school blog post about setting goals.

Dream BIG to WIN BIG
As you head into next week, we have one last question in this post. Do you have an educational project that could benefit from a $100 contribution and a FREE Teacher Peach product? Want to DREAM one up? Enter Teacher Peach’s “Granting Teacher Goals!” High 5 Initiative below.

Teacher Peach Granting Teacher Goals

Any educational project—large or small—is eligible if it helps kids learn, teachers teach, or just makes a tricky learning objective more engaging and exciting to learn—and teach! Through January 31st, you may enter 5 different projects from a single email address, by completing a separate application for each project. Winners will be announced starting February 1, 2016.

We hope these three different, yet connected worksheets spark you full of ways to fold them into your lesson plans during January as you help your students focus on the work at hand, setting DREAM-y goals, and honoring Martin Luther King, and Black History Month. Let us know how you use these worksheets and put them into action in your classroom!